Author Topic: Lupin Series 1: New viability for an American following?  (Read 5138 times)

sprak

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Re: Lupin Series 1: New viability for an American following?
« Reply #15 on: August 22, 2011, 03:07:42 pm »
I mean schools say that math, science, and reading and writing are important to learn because you will come across situations where knowing how to do these things will be useful. But when the hell are you ever going to need to pull back out a fact about World War II, the Mongol period, or feudal Europe again, except on a gameshow. I do believe that learning the main events in history is important, but it doesn't need to be all you learn. Schools should emphasize things that you can actually learn values from, learn concepts from, things that one can build upon for the betterment of the future. And things like movies, art, and music can help in this.

History is a part of learning values, concepts, etc. you can build upon. It's not meant to simply be trivia fodder. In fact, one could say the old films, etc. you want people to watch is the study of history. ;)


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And I promise that I will think carefully, and check some sources before accidentally making any more generalized statements. I do apologize Sprak.

No need to apologize; was a good talking point. Does availability equate to exposure? Given the proliferation of cable TV, home video, internet streaming, etc., availability is at an all-time high. However, is exposure occurring more or less frequently then in the past? Do kids these days care less about older media than those in the 70s/80s? Or is it just human nature to focus on the new shiny stuff while young and discover the old as you and your tastes mature?

I'm not trying to kill the conversation; just trying to get everyone to pause and consider the points being discussed.

GATSU

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Re: Lupin Series 1: New viability for an American following?
« Reply #16 on: August 22, 2011, 11:47:00 pm »
sprak:
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Only if people wanted to go see it; I can say my enthusiasm for the fourth film was next to nil after how 2 & 3 ended up.

Well, there were enough people who wanted to see it to make its money back. But it clearly disappointed in terms of returns, compared to the last one.

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I think Gundam has always had a following and always will. Too much merchandising power...

In Japan, yeah. In America, it's this generation's Battle Tech.

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Real question is if anyone still cares... Doubt it has the drawing power it had back in the initial VHS/LD US release days.

Well, they haven't let the license lapse like on other Geneon titles, so someone's still buying it...

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This is what banks do; they foreclose on people regardless of who they are or what they have done.

Yeah, but they're doing it with more force and lack of ethics or procedure lately. They're clearly overreaching, so seeing Lupin stick it to them will definitely be a type of wish-fulfillment which would not have been an asset on prior releases.

FilmmakerJ

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Re: Lupin Series 1: New viability for an American following?
« Reply #17 on: August 23, 2011, 12:36:36 am »
History is a part of learning values, concepts, etc. you can build upon. It's not meant to simply be trivia fodder. In fact, one could say the old films, etc. you want people to watch is the study of history. ;)

I understand history in itself helps one learn values and lessons. But I have learned much more useful things watching documentaries on the History and Discovery channels than I ever did in the classroom. And I got out of those documentaries much more meaningful concepts.

But I suppose just saying that won't make my feelings clear. Why don't I try to paint of picture of how I really feel about it.
 
I had taken an AP World history class for my 10th grade year. The book we used was a large, 900 page behemoth; that was known by the teacher and other teachers who have used it, as a poorly written, unorganized, mountain pile of randomly placed facts, with only a chapter/section title and a timeline to give it any semblance of structure. But despite all of these obvious problems, it was the only book my school could afford, so it was still the norm.

At first it was a daunting task to read the damn thing. Each chapter was 20-36 pages, and we were extremely lucky if we had the chance to read a 20 page chapter. The font size was a mere 11 point, so each chapter took 3 hours to read properly, at least for me. I've always been a good reader, many other students were terrible at pronunciation while I could sound out any long word, no matter if I've heard of it or not. However, I am a slow reader. So while some students managed, and other glided by; it was extremely hard for me to grasp the whole of the section as well as all the...randomly spaced facts and dates that would be essential for the multiple choice tests, as well as the many essays we wrote. I was lucky if I managed to write enough notes that I felt mildly confident that I understood the chapter.

At first the tests came out as Bs, or B minuses. But quickly those grades became Cs, and then the dreaded Ds. This abomination of a text book was tearing me apart. I stayed up late at night, peering over these long lines of small black letters against a white page that was almost painful to look at, what with the single dim florescent light above my room. As for studying, there really was no clear way to write proper notes that one could learn from in a structured way. I had only to rely on what little memory I had at the time. My memory has greatly improved since then, due to the very stress and mental conditioning I went through at the time.

By the end of the course, I had, somehow, regained some quality of grades. And I managed to pull out a 3, out of a 5 point scale, for the final exam. But what had I learned all throughout this daunting class? I learned about Chinese foot shaping. I learned about Genghis Khan. I learned about World War 1 and World War 2. I learned a larger amount about the Vietnam War. All of the usual stuff. The rest of it I couldn't even begin to remember, because those were the chapters that I failed in.  :P lol

My point in all of this, is that I learned about people, I learned about wars, I learned about dates and battles, and death tolls, and serfism, and succession, and a few somewhat odd practices. But what did I gain in morals? What did I gain in values? What did I gain in personal betterment?

I say... nothing.
If I learned anything, I learned how to strengthen my mind to take in loads of information, and reorder it into a coherent structure. And that's more than I can say for that BS of a book.

If this is all that AP history classes are teaching kids, then we have failed in carrying on our legacy and painting a proper picture of the human race. We shouldn't focus on dates and battles, death tolls and regimes. We should be focusing on what achievements man has made for the good of humanity, not for the good of power or greed or other such selfish matters.

I'm sorry for being so preachy there. I also just watched "Cyrano De Bergerac," so my speech pattern was a little more romantic. Lol. But this is my point. History classes should be doing more. And in all of mine I have seen a significant lack in teaching values and morals and other such lessons that promote common sense and wisdom.

If you have seen history classes teach good values, Sprak? Then I am wrong. At least in the thought that most history classes are like mine was. lol

But what I have told you is true. I have learned more in factual knowledge from my own movie and documentarial pursuits, than I ever have in the classroom. That includes dates, battles, and morals.  ;)

(I seem to be getting off topic a lot lately. But I needed to get that off my chest.)

Geist_MD

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Re: Lupin Series 1: New viability for an American following?
« Reply #18 on: August 23, 2011, 03:28:51 pm »
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This is what banks do; they foreclose on people regardless of who they are or what they have done.

Yeah, but they're doing it with more force and lack of ethics or procedure lately. They're clearly overreaching, so seeing Lupin stick it to them will definitely be a type of wish-fulfillment which would not have been an asset on prior releases.

I'm going to make a small note here and then let's just let the subject die on the vine. Real estate foreclosure is not a sticking point in politics as much as bailouts, which is equivocal to lending loan institutions so they, indeed, may pass on their continued assets to their customers, investors, shoreholders et al and not flop, causing a ripple effect in similar institutions and other economic stuctures. This is in addition to unethical financial practices like embezzlement, inside trading, and banks heavy hand in lobbying and the lobbyists who are usually tied to financial and celebrity figures in and out of politics, Wall Street, and Washington.

It's for that reason and a slew of other complex rationale that I'm going to ask that the banking stuff stay out of Lupin. It is not, now or ever, a motivation for the characters or the people behind production on any program. Inviting political orientation where there isn't any is a bad idea, let alone a topic as complex and oft misunderstood. Thanks, guys, I appreciate it.

(As a footnote, riveting stuff, keep up the great dialogue.)
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sprak

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Re: Lupin Series 1: New viability for an American following?
« Reply #19 on: August 23, 2011, 10:18:00 pm »
This will be on topic, but first...

<snip> tl;dr

I've had my share of classes that were rote memorization, but I have had ones that did delve into the more philosophical, moral, etc. aspects of the facts. It is the (sad) nature of the beast that the former is more prevalent.

So, on topic now it seems some camps of how Lupin might be viable in the US are forming. First, we have the camp that wants it recognized on it's own merits and place in the history of anime. For a home video media release, I do not think this is a viable model for the current market. However, a streaming approach inside a Netflix type model would work to build towards viable owner's market down the road.

The second camp feels that Lupin can tap into or co-opt more modern trends and find an audience that way. So far, the efforts have left me less than convinced that this approach will work.

What I think will have a significant impact on the upcoming release is the new TV series in Japan (if true). If that gains traction in the fan/digi sub circles, then any approach might have a good shot for a brief time.