Author Topic: More true to the manga?  (Read 20416 times)

SSJ3_Goku345

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Re: More true to the manga?
« Reply #15 on: June 11, 2014, 11:26:31 am »
There have been mixed impressions. Many people have commend the general look of the series. Then, some have praised the tone of the show, some others have criticized its lack of humor in comparison with other Lupin installments, and there have been favorable opinions to the soundtrack.

Most criticism has come from the serious, dark tint and themes of the plot -and in some cases, the mentioned lack of humor- as well as the considerable amount of nudity and the treat towards it (which has been described as  "misogynist"; again, in some cases).

But you will have to finish it to take your own conclusions!   :)

busterbeam

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Re: More true to the manga?
« Reply #16 on: June 12, 2014, 09:29:44 am »
I wouldn't say more true, But i have been reading the original Lupin manga and found AWCFM to be very reminiscent of the earlier work done. I know the art style changed as it went along but in the early stories but Lupin's pointy chin and the background art I especially found evocative in comparing to the Fujiko series. Specifically the first three tales in the manga.

One could argue, I think, that it's meant to be closer (closer not exact) to the early manga look due to it's place in the continuity of Lupin.

I want to ask (a tad off topic but curiosity and all).

What was the overall impression everyone got from Fujiko. I've only finished the first two episodes and the DVD's just came in but I was impressed with the serious tone, the art style was phenomenal, and I thought the Lupin character wasn't changed.

But in the first two stories, Lupin almost had a freakin' Popeye chin. In the third story his chin kinda switches back and forth between being pointy and Popeye-esque, but even the pointy one was a butt-chin which Fujiko Lupin lacked. Once again, MP wasn't an experienced artist during the very early chapters and didn't even know what he wanted Lupin to look like. He even explained this in an interview.

Visual characterization is just as important as writing, and early manga Lupin was way more emotive. Fujiko Lupin spends too much time just sitting there with a 'badass anime man' expression. He had some funny moments but they felt like occasional bits of comic relief moreso than an integral part of who he is.

Look at all of Lupin faces here; we have two pages without any gags in one of the more serious chapters; and even there, he's making all sorts of cartoony expressions. http://i.imgur.com/LsBeDaa.jpg Meanwhile, Fujiko Lupin just suddenly switched from "anime badass mode" to "wacky Bugs Bunny mode" when the script required a 'funny zany moment' (and the 'funny zany moments' were rare).

Even writing-wise, it was clear they ironed out the more controversial aspects of Lupin's manga character. Not to mention, they wrote a completely different personality for Zenigata AND gave him a radically different design.

SSJ3_Goku345

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Re: More true to the manga?
« Reply #17 on: December 21, 2014, 06:58:42 pm »
Sorry for reviving this topic. I would like to share my opinion, though it might be a little late. This is a very, very interesting topic to discuss about.

I agree with many statements done here. Personally, I would say that Koike's designs are the closest to the manga -as far as the base designs go- of recent Lupin installments. That being said, it's necessary to specify which age of Monkey Punch's art are we comparing the designs with, because the differences between these ages are really huge.

If Koike's designs resemble something, that resemblance is no doubt with MP's artwork at the end of the first manga series. I'm talking about the original run of 90+ chapters; not including the Lupin III New Adventures run that is included in the volume releases; which by the way, isn't as cartoony and zany -in general- as the early art of the series. Question is: do they look absolutely alike (like Reed said, a 1:1 adaptation)? No, but they look pretty similar in a way.

Fujiko's and Gravestone's art play with some of MP's conventions bringing them to new grounds. In other words, Takeshi Koike has got some of MP's artistically habits and mixed them with his own style. The result is these character designs: something different, fresh and new that, while not being totally close to Monkey Punch, has something in common. And that makes those designs good, if you ask me.

Then, like someone stated earlier, most Lupin designs have been based upon Otsuka's own designs, so there hasn't been a load of artwork which can be compared to the original work, aside from lankiness and some disproportion in bodies and hands. Personally, I would say the closest ones -in terms of base designs- have been the Pilot Film, Dead or Alive, Lupin VIII and Koike's interpretation; each of them looking like a totally different age of Kato's art.

To finish, I'd like to say that I'd LOVE to see some Lupin adaptation in the fashion of Alice, both in terms of design and motion. Now that would be top notch!


Red Dear

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Re: More true to the manga?
« Reply #18 on: December 22, 2014, 02:03:53 pm »
Thank you Goku for your contribution to this (surpsingly controversial) topic.

Your point is made with intelligence and reason and so I completely agree with it !

Monkey Punch's art style has evolved numerous times over the decaces and Koike has indeed created this
balance between his own sensibility and MP's early works.

Thank you. :)
Time to play the game, time to get a chance !

SSJ3_Goku345

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Re: More true to the manga?
« Reply #19 on: December 23, 2014, 09:05:54 am »
Thanks to you for your comments!!  ;)

Red Dear

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Re: More true to the manga?
« Reply #20 on: February 27, 2016, 11:15:17 pm »
While I don't want to reignate an old and possibly useless debate, I wanted to share some thoughts, following my recent
rewatch of the series, thanks to my french licensed dvds.

The first episode of Mine Fujiko To Iu Onna is practically 100% Monkey Punch in terms of elements and spirit. The only thing sticking out might be Oscar who's role in the series is one of symbolism and commentary, but for the rest, it's very Monkey Punch-like.

But I think that the real difference with Monkey Punch's original work (meaning the one from 1967 to 1972) is the purpose or even the sense of purpose. Monkey Punch's stories were mainly parodies. Parodies of crime novels, heist movies and spy movies. It really wasn't meant to be taken completely seriously. The stories were usually short and revolved on deception, tricks and twists. There is all that in Mine Fujiko since the whole point of the series is to trick both the characters and the audience to follow a narrative only to realise it was all manipulation and fabricated memories. The difference is the the series focuses more on characters than action and, by consequence, the tone is far more serious while keeping hints of humor throughout.

And that's what I take from this series. It is a different take on familiar tropes. It isn't Monkey Punch but it takes many tips from him, both visually and narratively. But it is first and foremost, a take on Lupin. And Lupin is, in a way, bigger than his original author and more than his origins.
Time to play the game, time to get a chance !