Author Topic: A successful modernizing of Lupin  (Read 1040 times)

Lupus Zeniga

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A successful modernizing of Lupin
« on: August 21, 2016, 05:38:30 AM »
Hayao Miyazaki wrote an article in Animage where he stated that Lupin was "truly a character of his era, but that as the franchise progressed he had been overtaken by the real world." For the most part, it looks like he was right; by the 2000s digital tech and surveillance had made Lupin's escapades more difficult, and thus more unrealistic and unbelievable a hero. It took THE WOMAN CALLED FUJIKO MINE and JIGEN's GRAVESTONE to make Lupin a serious and grounded character, and these properties were set in the 1960s-70s.

However, this show appears to have done a successful job at updating Lupin to the modern era. It makes him cunning enough to be on par with a British agent, and generally his schemes are realistic enough so that they could definitely succeed. Also most of his adventures aren't too bizarre or insane, for the most part they are challenging enough for him to succeed and any fantastic stuff is toned down.

I'd say this show definitely brought Lupin successfully into the modern era. Would you agree?

Psycho_Kenshin

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Re: A successful modernizing of Lupin
« Reply #1 on: August 29, 2016, 10:15:36 PM »
Interesting, do you think Miyazaki was talking on the practical things you mention, or maybe more about Lupin as a character? Since his rough and bawdy ways might be considered a throwback today, that outlaw scoundrel he is (though also with a heart of gold, especially as portrayed by Miyazaki).

Lupin to me is timeless, tough to say what engages an audience today in particular, but doing that means you're doing well.
« Last Edit: August 29, 2016, 10:15:49 PM by Psycho_Kenshin »

Red Dear

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Re: A successful modernizing of Lupin
« Reply #2 on: August 30, 2016, 06:50:05 AM »
The more I think about, the more I am convinced Lupin III works best as a period piece, preferably set between the late 60's to the early 80's. But that may be due to the fact that the manga version is a big influence on how I see the character and his style. ^^

We had of course our lot of productions putting Lupin in our modern world with good results (I think the recent blue jacket series is the best example) but I always felt like the main Lupin cast always feels slightly anachronistic, either in appearence or behaviour. But that's not always a bad thing. Lupin and Co represent a mindest of adventure, freedom (and moderate anarchy) that is sorely missed in our modern cynical and tense world (at least to me). So to have those characters from an another time helping us to remember something we lost, that's not bad.

But I would love to see a Lupin adaptation really ingrained in our modern times. It doesn't have to be grim and gritty but a slight re-imagining could be fun. ^^

At least, that's my two cents on the matter. :)
Time to play the game, time to get a chance !

Psycho_Kenshin

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Re: A successful modernizing of Lupin
« Reply #3 on: August 30, 2016, 03:23:48 PM »
One of my fav movies is Pulp Fiction, which feels like a 70s period piece even though it is set in the 90s. To me I just go with the flow on the style of something, what year it's set doesn't really matter to me. You can have a retro style in something that has some cellphones and fancy computers in it I guess.  :)

Lupus Zeniga

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Re: A successful modernizing of Lupin
« Reply #4 on: August 30, 2016, 05:22:35 PM »
Interesting, do you think Miyazaki was talking on the practical things you mention, or maybe more about Lupin as a character?
Probably the practical things. Wikipedia says the Animage article was written around 1980, when Miyazaki was done with Lupin permanently. As far as I can guess, it was partly Miyazaki wanting to move onto more ambitious things with Ghibli like Nausicaa, and partly Miyazaki feeling he'd done enough stories with Lupin and couldn't do any more.


The more I think about, the more I am convinced Lupin III works best as a period piece, preferably set between the late 60's to the early 80's.

We had of course our lot of productions putting Lupin in our modern world with good results (I think the recent blue jacket series is the best example) but I always felt like the main Lupin cast always feels slightly anachronistic, either in appearance or behaviour. But that's not always a bad thing. Lupin and Co represent a mindset of adventure, freedom (and moderate anarchy) that is sorely missed in our modern cynical and tense world (at least to me). So to have those characters from an another time helping us to remember something we lost, that's not bad.
I consider Lupin (and his gang and nemesis) to be akin to James Bond. Both started out in the 1960s and are still going strong today, even though their heyday was in their first twenty years and the progress of computer technology has made things difficult for them both.

Like Bond, the characters may be slightly anachronistic (a cop and robber, and a femme fatale, and perhaps most of all a Western gunslinger and a samurai), but I think that like Bond their abilities and personalities stand the test of time and make them not only appealing but a force to be reckoned with.


I would love to see a Lupin adaptation really ingrained in our modern times. It doesn't have to be grim and gritty but a slight re-imagining could be fun. ^^
I think we got that with the Blue Jacket show. It had a British agent working on something that caught Lupin's attention, and Rebecca as a rival to both Lupin and Fujiko.