Author Topic: Did Castle of Cagliostro almost ruin Miyazaki's career in anime?  (Read 12137 times)

Reed

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Re: Did Castle of Cagliostro almost ruin Miyazaki's career in anime?
« Reply #15 on: April 22, 2012, 10:11:56 am »
Miyazaki almost never does interviews, period. Any Ghibli fan who follows the guy can confirm this easily. It has nothing to do with his feelings toward Cagliostro in particular.

J: He talks about the movie several times in the book. There's also a huge 11-page interview with him and Ohtsuka about the film in the Cagliostro Mook, as you should well know. He had no significant hesitation talking about the film, and if he does now, it's probably because it's not his featuring his own invented intellectual property, which is not the case for the majority of his films. Although he has licensed a couple IPs, like Kiki and Howl, but those were late enough in his career that he probably had much more creative freedom with them (he couldn't just delete Goemon from a Lupin movie, after all).

Second, who's asking about "Cagliostro" in interviews and getting apathetic responses from Miyazaki about it? "Cagliostro" was ultimately huge for Miyazaki--through it he met John Lasseter and Toshio Suzuki, who encouraged Miyazaki to develop Nausicaa. I think people aren't asking about "Cagliostro" because he's come a long way since then and no interviewers lucky enough to score an interview with him care about "Lupin" anymore.
« Last Edit: April 22, 2012, 10:21:18 am by Reed »
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Re: Did Castle of Cagliostro almost ruin Miyazaki's career in anime?
« Reply #16 on: April 22, 2012, 02:18:57 pm »
Why didn't you come onto this earlier Reed, we could have spared so many unnecessary speculation. This is exactly what I was thinking.

Has anyone seen this by the way:
(click to show/hide)
It's my consensus of all the information I have learned thus far about Miyazaki, Pixar, Disney, and Lupin the 3rd.

I have not yet made one for my recent discoveries, but what I have learned most recently is that it is possible Steven Speilberg did see the car chase scene of Cagliostro while attending popping by the Los Angeles International Film Exposition, which was put on by some people who were friends of John Lasseter. Lasseter was responcible for getting Cagliostro shown there at Filmex. This then led to why some of the images in the later Indiana Jones movies resemble Cagliostro, and why some of the Disney animators and storymen may have made the Clock Tower scene in "The Great Mouse Detective" look the way it did. Sure there is nothing obviously imitated, but this isn't much of a stretch.

Now I didn't know that Lasseter went to meet Miyazaki that early and actually convinced him to continue the Nausicaa project. But if that's the case then Miyazaki was going through a bit of a hard time.

I suppose if we've been trying to decide whether Cagliostro ruined Miyazaki's career, then No, it clearly seems that it didn't. Rather it might have hindered his career, or more likely caused some slight speculation as to whether or not he could deliver what people wanted if they were to ask him to direct another adaptation film. But that only happened till after he created his own stories with Nausicaa and Laputa. Which were all his own projects on much of his own terms. So with all of his planning and constant work on other televised projects, how can we think his career was ruined. A career isn't ruined if progress is still going on. Just because he didn't direct another movie in 3 years doesn't mean he wasn't getting hired for more projects.

Bottom line, no, I don't think it ruined anything.

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Re: Did Castle of Cagliostro almost ruin Miyazaki's career in anime?
« Reply #17 on: April 22, 2012, 06:05:17 pm »
I have not yet made one for my recent discoveries, but what I have learned most recently is that it is possible Steven Speilberg did see the car chase scene of Cagliostro while attending popping by the Los Angeles International Film Exposition, which was put on by some people who were friends of John Lasseter. Lasseter was responcible for getting Cagliostro shown there at Filmex. This then led to why some of the images in the later Indiana Jones movies resemble Cagliostro, and why some of the Disney animators and storymen may have made the Clock Tower scene in "The Great Mouse Detective" look the way it did. Sure there is nothing obviously imitated, but this isn't much of a stretch.

Now I didn't know that Lasseter went to meet Miyazaki that early and actually convinced him to continue the Nausicaa project. But if that's the case then Miyazaki was going through a bit of a hard time.


I would like more information on your source for the LA Int. Film Expo. That's something I hadn't heard before.

Lasseter had nothing to do with the Nausicaa thing, only Suzuki did. Suzuki, one of the heads of Studio Ghibli, was the one who convinced Miyazaki to start Nausicaa so that he could make it into a film later on. I mentioned Lasseter because his relationship with Miyazaki was a big deal in the long run, and the poorly worded sentence was admittedly confusing.

I'd be careful about concluding that because Spielberg may have seen the film (not that anyone who was there or even Spielberg himself have ever confirmed this), that he must have been influenced by it to the point that it shows in his own work. You can say he might have been influenced, but I would be hesitant to say it was more than a possibility or even just a coincidence. There was hearsay that US animators feared for their jobs upon seeing "Cagliostro," but I have not yet heard where that was started. As such, I treat it as just that: hearsay.
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Re: Did Castle of Cagliostro almost ruin Miyazaki's career in anime?
« Reply #18 on: April 22, 2012, 10:19:37 pm »
I would like more information on your source for the LA Int. Film Expo. That's something I hadn't heard before.

Lasseter had nothing to do with the Nausicaa thing, only Suzuki did. Suzuki, one of the heads of Studio Ghibli, was the one who convinced Miyazaki to start Nausicaa so that he could make it into a film later on. I mentioned Lasseter because his relationship with Miyazaki was a big deal in the long run, and the poorly worded sentence was admittedly confusing.

I'd be careful about concluding that because Spielberg may have seen the film (not that anyone who was there or even Spielberg himself have ever confirmed this), that he must have been influenced by it to the point that it shows in his own work. You can say he might have been influenced, but I would be hesitant to say it was more than a possibility or even just a coincidence. There was hearsay that US animators feared for their jobs upon seeing "Cagliostro," but I have not yet heard where that was started. As such, I treat it as just that: hearsay.

Well the whole thing really is just speculation, but I'm trying to tie these things together because they make sense chronologically based upon what I know thus far.

And the source for the LA International Film Expo comes from Lasseter himself, from the very first page of the Foreward in "Starting Point."
Here is the transcription:
Quote from: John Lasseter
I first met Hayao Miyazaki-san about twenty years ago in Los Angeles. He had just completed Lupin III: The Castle of Cagliostro. I didn't have the opportunity to see the whole movie; I just saw a small reel of clips. But from the little I did see, I was taken with the characters. I was also impressed with the energy and cleverness of the animation. I still think it contains one of the best car chases ever seen on film. (maybe John actually said that, and not Spielberg. Still might be good for advertisement though) ... The Castle of Cagliostro is so much more than taking a live-action film and making it animation. It took the medium and really used it to its fullest potential. That's what always inspired me about every Miyazaki-san film I've seen. ... I remember taking the clips to Walt Disney Studios and showing them to various people. This was probably back in the early 1980s. I had some friends on the organizing committee of the Los Angeles International Film Exposition and we worked together to get Castle of Cagliostro shown at Filmex. ... I was thrilled to finally see it on the big screen, with a live audience. People just loved it.

After that he says he next met Miyazaki in 1987, in Japan when he was going to a Japanese Computer Graphics expo. And he got invited to the Ghibli studios to see the work being done on Totoro. So it seems he did not have any influence on Miyazaki working on Nausicaa.

But as you can see, he got Cagliostro to be shown in front of a real audience of 1980s film goers and movie enthusiasts at a real Festival. Which I thought Spielberg might have went to see because of curiosity or something. But if he didn't, then maybe Lasseter is the one who really said that quote, and not Spielberg. It sure was written about the same in this book here. Although this interview was taken in 2005, far after the Streamline trailer where the narrator says that Spielberg though it was the greatest car chase. Back then Lasseter might have only made "Toy Story." Not yet a well established name in the industry.

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Re: Did Castle of Cagliostro almost ruin Miyazaki's career in anime?
« Reply #19 on: April 22, 2012, 11:57:39 pm »
Reed: Yeah, but he's done interviews recently. Although if you really wanna go there, you could also include his rants.  ;)

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Second, who's asking about "Cagliostro" in interviews and getting apathetic responses from Miyazaki about it?

Well, the last official comment he made on Cagliostro was how long it took to finish it, and that was it. I was there at that Q+A, btw. No sense of nostalgia or anything. And he comes off very talkative. But that statement was brief. Although I will say he seemed like he was in a cheerful mood. But he didn't seem to want to say more.

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I'd be careful about concluding that because Spielberg may have seen the film (not that anyone who was there or even Spielberg himself have ever confirmed this), that he must have been influenced by it to the point that it shows in his own work.

OT, but I do believe that, if Spielberg did see Cagliostro, that was the movie which got him motivated to work on Indiana Jones. 'Cus you notice it finally got off the ground a year later. Yes, Raiders had been in development for a while, but it's pretty damned obvious that it carries a lot of Lupin-esque elements to it. As for whether or not it can be confirmed he saw it, people have quoted him without being sued, so he either doesn't notice, or doesn't care. And if it's the latter, that means he's at least familiar with it.

Filmmaker: I didn't say 'Castle ruined Miyazakis' career, but that it almost did. I mean, Babylon aside, you look at how many gigs even Oshii got in the 80s, and you've got to wonder if Miyazaki wasn't blacklisted. In fact, at this point, I wonder if Lasseter was the one who saved his career. The reason is that Topcraft merged into what later became Ghibli, and there's a good chance Miyazaki worked for them on The Last Unicorn-albeit without any official credits-since he knew the people there. And that's really what got him funding for Nausicaa. 
« Last Edit: April 23, 2012, 12:02:30 am by GATSU »

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Re: Did Castle of Cagliostro almost ruin Miyazaki's career in anime?
« Reply #20 on: April 23, 2012, 01:15:43 am »
Reed: Yeah, but he's done interviews recently. Although if you really wanna go there, you could also include his rants.  ;)

Quote
Second, who's asking about "Cagliostro" in interviews and getting apathetic responses from Miyazaki about it?

Well, the last official comment he made on Cagliostro was how long it took to finish it, and that was it. I was there at that Q+A, btw. No sense of nostalgia or anything. And he comes off very talkative. But that statement was brief. Although I will say he seemed like he was in a cheerful mood. But he didn't seem to want to say more.

Quote
I'd be careful about concluding that because Spielberg may have seen the film (not that anyone who was there or even Spielberg himself have ever confirmed this), that he must have been influenced by it to the point that it shows in his own work.

OT, but I do believe that, if Spielberg did see Cagliostro, that was the movie which got him motivated to work on Indiana Jones. 'Cus you notice it finally got off the ground a year later. Yes, Raiders had been in development for a while, but it's pretty damned obvious that it carries a lot of Lupin-esque elements to it. As for whether or not it can be confirmed he saw it, people have quoted him without being sued, so he either doesn't notice, or doesn't care. And if it's the latter, that means he's at least familiar with it.

Filmmaker: I didn't say 'Castle ruined Miyazakis' career, but that it almost did. I mean, Babylon aside, you look at how many gigs even Oshii got in the 80s, and you've got to wonder if Miyazaki wasn't blacklisted. In fact, at this point, I wonder if Lasseter was the one who saved his career. The reason is that Topcraft merged into what later became Ghibli, and there's a good chance Miyazaki worked for them on The Last Unicorn-albeit without any official credits-since he knew the people there. And that's really what got him funding for Nausicaa. 

Well if we could ever get confirmation on any of this information, that would be spectacular. Because honestly I could care less if it ruined his career or not; whatever the case, it clearly only hindered it rather than ruined it. And if we could ever find out what got him back on track, I just wanna know who to thank. 'Cause the old boy is still here. He had a wonderful stream of films. And Cagliostro is still a "Damn Good" movie.

We can't really ask the question, "Did Cagliostro ruin Miyazaki's career?" because "Ruin" infers that it was over and done with right there, no rising from the grave afterwards. "Put his career on hold" is more like it.

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Re: Did Castle of Cagliostro almost ruin Miyazaki's career in anime?
« Reply #21 on: April 23, 2012, 01:18:14 am »
Well the whole thing really is just speculation, but I'm trying to tie these things together because they make sense chronologically based upon what I know thus far.

And the source for the LA International Film Expo comes from Lasseter himself, from the very first page of the Foreward in "Starting Point."
Here is the transcription:
Quote from: John Lasseter
I first met Hayao Miyazaki-san about twenty years ago in Los Angeles. He had just completed Lupin III: The Castle of Cagliostro. I didn't have the opportunity to see the whole movie; I just saw a small reel of clips. But from the little I did see, I was taken with the characters. I was also impressed with the energy and cleverness of the animation. I still think it contains one of the best car chases ever seen on film. (maybe John actually said that, and not Spielberg. Still might be good for advertisement though) ... The Castle of Cagliostro is so much more than taking a live-action film and making it animation. It took the medium and really used it to its fullest potential. That's what always inspired me about every Miyazaki-san film I've seen. ... I remember taking the clips to Walt Disney Studios and showing them to various people. This was probably back in the early 1980s. I had some friends on the organizing committee of the Los Angeles International Film Exposition and we worked together to get Castle of Cagliostro shown at Filmex. ... I was thrilled to finally see it on the big screen, with a live audience. People just loved it.

After that he says he next met Miyazaki in 1987, in Japan when he was going to a Japanese Computer Graphics expo. And he got invited to the Ghibli studios to see the work being done on Totoro. So it seems he did not have any influence on Miyazaki working on Nausicaa.

But as you can see, he got Cagliostro to be shown in front of a real audience of 1980s film goers and movie enthusiasts at a real Festival. Which I thought Spielberg might have went to see because of curiosity or something. But if he didn't, then maybe Lasseter is the one who really said that quote, and not Spielberg. It sure was written about the same in this book here. Although this interview was taken in 2005, far after the Streamline trailer where the narrator says that Spielberg though it was the greatest car chase. Back then Lasseter might have only made "Toy Story." Not yet a well established name in the industry.

Ha! I totally read that foreword too. I guess the relevance of that statement didn't sink in until you quoted it.

I've never seen Streamline Pictures' trailer for "Cagliostro." Is it on YouTube somewhere? Your theory has some weight about Lasseter being the one to offer the quote. He's probably the most likely in the business to be so vocal about his love for the film. But back in the 80s, he wasn't that big of a deal yet, so I could see someone quickly twisting the quote through a Telephone game. Or perhaps Lasseter himself talked to Spielberg and started the rumor himself. Nearly endless possibilities exist. Maybe Lasseter would have greater insight into the starting of this rumor. Hmmm.

Like I said, yeah, Lasseter had nothing whatsoever to do with Nausicaa. I phrased the sentence poorly is all. But he did meet Miyazaki around late 1979/1980, so it isn't impossible that he encouraged him to work on a comic project, but I doubt that's how that meeting would've gone down and it's certainly not something I would seriously claim.

Gatsu: You're making a mountain out of a molehill. Just because the guy didn't have any published animated works to show for it for, what, two years doesn't mean he didn't keep busy or have work. He had Lupin to polish off in 1980 while he was at Telecom. Nausicaa went into production in 1983 and he was gainfully employed at least part of the time in between at Telecom trying to help them get their crap together. I will grant you that in an Empire Online interview he talks a bit about Nausicaa: "The original manga was written when I had no job in animation — I had a lot of time to myself, so I tried to make a comic that couldn’t be made into animation. And then later I had to make it into a film, so I was in deep trouble! " However, his statement isn't entirely true either—he didn't even finish the manga until 1994, ten years after the film was done.

Miyazaki also isn't super-proud of the final product, apparently, either. Not because he felt it got him "blacklisted," I don't think, but because he didn't think the quality was up to his usual anal standards (see the interview quote in the paragraph below for that). Here's what he said about Cagliostro in an interview for Ponyo.
Quote
Actually, I didn’t know European landscapes and architecture very well back then.... I created the setting: ‘Here’s two lakes, a castle, there’s a Roman aqueduct...’ And then I thought, ‘Yes, now I can make a film on this!’ I just wish that I could have done it much, much better!
He made a similar observation about the film in "Starting Point": "You can't use a sullied middle-aged guy to create fresh work that will wow viewers. I realized I should never do this again. Neither did I want to. Even so, I did two more [Part II Episodes 145,155] and it was hell. With every piece I made it was obvious that I was just trotting out everything I had done before. [laughs]  1980 was my year of being mired in gloom" (p. 351). Not exactly a happy time for the filmmaker, but it sounds more like he was in a rut than out of opportunities.

Miyazaki always does a round of interviews after he releases a new film because he is encouraged to by Toshio Suzuki, I'm sure. Here's a snippet from a 2009 interview from UK publication The Independent (http://www.independent.co.uk/news/people/profiles/hayao-miyazaki-modern-movies-are-too-weird-for-me-1678129.html):
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Genius recluse, über-perfectionist, lapsed Marxist, Luddite; like the legendary directors of Hollywood's Golden Age, Hayao Miyazaki's intimidating reputation is almost as famous as his movies. Mostly, though, Japan's undisputed animation king is known for shunning interviews. So it is remarkable to find him sitting opposite us in Studio Ghibli, the Tokyo animation house he co-founded in 1985, reluctantly bracing himself for the media onslaught that now accompanies each of his new projects.

Gatsu, I'll grant you that it's a nice theory, but I still think you're reading too much into it. The burden of proof is on you at this point. Most of your proof has been conjecture and your own theory masquerading as proof. Let's see something of substance and let's see you clarify exactly what you mean by "almost killing his career." Do you believe he could not find employment for X period of time? How long was that time span? Was he actively looking for employment?

The real problem with your proposal (or was it a claim?), Gatsu, is that you want to inject causality into the equation: "if Miyazaki couldn't find work during the early 80s, it was because of 'Cagliostro.'" I do not believe that is the case, and you'd have one heck of a time proving that.

Here's my opinion: I'm satisfied that if he just wanted work, he could find it. He had been a film director, though, and he wasn't going to settle for less unless he had to. He did Lupin probably for the income: he didn't even attach his name to the episodes (he was credited as a series of kanji that can be pronounced "Terekomu"). The Nausicaa manga was done to keep his name on the radar. Little Nemo might've become a directorial role for him if there wasn't so much conflict over the project's direction. I think he wanted to know what he wanted to do before he just jumped out there and did it. It would do you both really well, Daniel and J, to watch the documentary that was included on the Nausicaa DVD or Blu-ray/DVD combo. It's very informative about this period in Miyazaki's life. And the film makes it clear: "Cagliostro" is the film that got Toshio Suzuki to give Miyazaki direction. Without Suzuki, there'd be no Ghibli, no Nausicaa. And with that info, I'd say your suggestion is null and void right there.
« Last Edit: April 23, 2012, 01:25:40 am by Reed »
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Re: Did Castle of Cagliostro almost ruin Miyazaki's career in anime?
« Reply #22 on: April 23, 2012, 03:24:50 am »
[quote =Reed]I've never seen Streamline Pictures' trailer for "Cagliostro." Is it on YouTube somewhere?[/quote]

Surprisingly yes, and it apparently can also be found on RetroJunk.com: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wpFL1Yb0JdE

You have made some sound points here, Reed. I congratulate you.  8) I take it you've also listened to the fan-commentary for "Cagliostro?" I don't remember the name of the man who did it, but I still have it stored away on my home computer somewhere.

BTW, can anyone confirm whether or not a "Cliffhanger" Laserdisk arcade can be seen in the pizza joint scene in "The Goonies?" I once watched a guy mention this factoid on his review of "Cliffhanger." I just wanted to know whether it was wikipedia gossip or not.  ???

I really do wish I could learn everything about this film. I'm hoping to become the world's foremost expert on "Cagliostro," along with having the world's largest memorabilia collection  ;D. But it's annoying to think that I will never know a lot of things about the movie because I'll never be able to read that stinking movie book until I can either get a Japanese character recognizing program and a text translator, or learn the cumbersome task of reading Japanese  :'(. But I feel I've done good so far. Finally figured out there isn't a 3rd English dub and it was just Streamline and 2 Manga releases.  ;)

I'm still working on my Cagliostro influence chart. If anyone has any other reasonable theories or confirmed info to include in it, I'd be most pleased  :D:

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Re: Did Castle of Cagliostro almost ruin Miyazaki's career in anime?
« Reply #23 on: April 23, 2012, 06:46:08 am »
Reed:
Quote
Let's see something of substance and let's see you clarify exactly what you mean by "almost killing his career." Do you believe he could not find employment for X period of time? How long was that time span? Was he actively looking for employment?

I would say the period is 1980-1984, outside of the Nausicaa manga. And not necessarily employment, but gainful employment.  As for the last question, of course he was looking for employment. Who was Hayao Miyazaki in the late 70s to anyone in Japan? And I define "almost killing his career" as being denied higher-level animation work, such as directing, producing, and/or supervising.

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I do not believe that is the case, and you'd have one heck of a time proving that.

So can you explain how an animator who was living in the most prosperous decade for animation in Japan did not get more gigs? I mean, Oshii even got money for live-action films back then.

Quote
He had been a film director, though, and he wasn't going to settle for less unless he had to.

So what about Sherlock Hound?

Quote
It would do you both really well, Daniel and J, to watch the documentary that was included on the Nausicaa DVD or Blu-ray/DVD combo. It's very informative about this period in Miyazaki's life.

Whenever Amazon stops sitting on my copy, I will.

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And the film makes it clear: "Cagliostro" is the film that got Toshio Suzuki to give Miyazaki direction.

But Suzuki doesn't really factor into the equation until Kiki. Before then, he was just part of Topcraft.

Edit: BTW, this thread isn't meant in any way to bash Miyazaki. Having finished Ocean Waves a few months ago, I have to say nothing resonates more with my youth and adolescence of the late 80s and early 90s than Ghibli's output. I'm just curious
about the circumstances of the period between Cagliostro and Sherlock Hound, because it's such an unusual time. I mean, even Tomino got gigs after Gundam originally flopped. So I can't help but wonder if Miyazaki stepped on one too many toes. He's obviously the type who likes to intentionally rub people the wrong way with his acerbic comments, even though I think that's part of his charm. But maybe, like the young Lupin in that movie, he was also a bit cocky because that was his directorial debut?
« Last Edit: April 23, 2012, 07:24:23 am by GATSU »

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Re: Did Castle of Cagliostro almost ruin Miyazaki's career in anime?
« Reply #24 on: April 23, 2012, 08:15:51 am »
Quote from: Reed
It would do you both really well, Daniel and J, to watch the documentary that was included on the Nausicaa DVD or Blu-ray/DVD combo. It's very informative about this period in Miyazaki's life.

Whenever Amazon stops sitting on my copy, I will.


Why wait any longer when you can watch it right now  ;D, YOUTUBE to the Rescue!

This is all three parts of the very same documentary that you will find on either the DVD or the Blu-ray version of the Disney release of Nausicaa. The 1st and 3rd part you can see on youtube, but the 2nd part redirects you to a dailymotion page due to copyright issues on the audio track, so I just gave you the dailymotion page there. But go watch those when you have the time today or tomorrow and factor it into your conjecture. It's not a bad little documentary either.

Part 1: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cZtnNdJP83I
Part 2: http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xokml2_tbosg-part-2-of-3_shortfilms
Part 3: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w3uMpJ2UW-I&feature=relmfu

GATSU

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Re: Did Castle of Cagliostro almost ruin Miyazaki's career in anime?
« Reply #25 on: April 23, 2012, 09:04:57 am »
I'm also a bit backlogged.

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Re: Did Castle of Cagliostro almost ruin Miyazaki's career in anime?
« Reply #26 on: April 23, 2012, 10:55:08 am »
Gatsu: Even if it's true that Miyazaki was barely employed (or wholly unemployed, which is patently false) from 1980-1984, you have yet to even provide plausible conjecture that it was "Cagliostro" that kept him from getting work. i.e., he would have to have been blacklisted or there have to have been people on record who have done research into the matter or been there at the time (like Miyazaki himself) that can actually say "No one would hire Miyazaki because of 'Castle of Cagliostro.'" This thread proves nothing until then.

Also, he was series director on Sherlock Hound before it was put on hiatus. It's not a film director position but it certainly has more prestige than covering random "Lupin" TV episodes. EDIT: Indeed, he even put the Nausicaa movie project on hold in order to work on it.

Some additional insight as to the order of events follows:
Quote
Meantime, inside one of many Tokyo's offices, Hayao Miyazaki and Isao Takahata ran against TMS president Yutaka Fujioka, who wanted to involved them in the planning of LITTLE NEMO (a feature film co-produced with foreign financial benefits). But Miyazaki had never accepted any order from the commercial managements. After the CAGLIOSTRO's commercial failure he was employed as teacher at Telecom Animation Film (TAF): it was and still is the most important TMS subsidiary. Soon afterward, he was called by Tokuma Shoten to realize an animated version of its manga NAUSICAÄ. With much of disappoint of the Animage readers, it was interrupted to develop MEITANTEI HOLMES, a very expensive TV series co-produced between TMS and Italian Rever. Howhere, HOLMES was frozen after just four episodes completed, because of some economical problems. So, Isao Takahata, in its new role of executive producer, was in charged to find a production facility able to make NAUSICAÄ, since Tokuma was a publishing house with no experience in animated films.
(from "Topcraft/Studio Ghibli Complete History" http://xoomer.virgilio.it/fedgrame/part3a.htm )
« Last Edit: April 23, 2012, 10:56:03 am by Reed »
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Re: Did Castle of Cagliostro almost ruin Miyazaki's career in anime?
« Reply #27 on: April 23, 2012, 11:32:27 am »

Quote
We can't really ask the question, "Did Cagliostro ruin Miyazaki's career?" because "Ruin" infers that it was over and done with right there, no rising from the grave afterwards. "Put his career on hold" is more like it.
The name of the thread is "Did Cagliostro Almost Ruin Miyazaki's career?" :)

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Re: Did Castle of Cagliostro almost ruin Miyazaki's career in anime?
« Reply #28 on: April 23, 2012, 01:55:35 pm »

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We can't really ask the question, "Did Cagliostro ruin Miyazaki's career?" because "Ruin" infers that it was over and done with right there, no rising from the grave afterwards. "Put his career on hold" is more like it.
The name of the thread is "Did Cagliostro Almost Ruin Miyazaki's career?" :)


Oh, I'm sorry.  :-[

I guess we just haven't been using enough synonyms of "almost" that I forgot that it wasn't a definite "Did it ruin his career" question.

GATSU

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Re: Did Castle of Cagliostro almost ruin Miyazaki's career in anime?
« Reply #29 on: April 23, 2012, 06:27:19 pm »
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you have yet to even provide plausible conjecture that it was "Cagliostro" that kept him from getting work. i.e.,

Well, let's see. He was getting a whole bunch of gigs in the 70s, and then Cagliostro came along, and then almost nothing until Nausicaa.

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Also, he was series director on Sherlock Hound before it was put on hiatus. It's not a film director position but it certainly has more prestige than covering random "Lupin" TV episodes.

Perhaps, but you're arguing that he was independent by then, but the fact that he had to go back to tv suggests otherwise.

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But Miyazaki had never accepted any order from the commercial managements.

That sort of supports my argument that he burned some bridges during that period. Nemo, though, isn't really a good example in general, because if Wikipedia is any indication, it was always going to be a trainwreck. The fact that anything watchable was produced from that many "cooks" is the real miracle. 

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Howhere, HOLMES was frozen after just four episodes completed, because of some economical problems

Again, economical problems during a decade which funded almost any anime?